What's All This Then?

This site is edited by Coudal Partners, a design, advertising and interactive studio in Chicago, as an ongoing experiment in web publishing, design and commerce. [Next]

What's All This Then?

Thanks for visiting. If browsing around here while at work has had a negative effect on your productivity we're sorry but imagine what it's done to ours. [Hide]

Saturday Edition

Two designers, 15 minutes per volley, the whole world watching.
Revisit the last two seasons of Layer Tennis.

Coudal Partners

New in The MoOM

Ways of Seeing

There's something for everyone in the Spring Exhibitions at our Museum of Online Museums. For example, the image above is from X-Ray Delta One's fabulous collection of scans on Flickr. Like most cultural institutions, The MoOM needs the support of the community to survive. Well, not really, since we don't have a building or a staff or even those cheap little round colored badges that you hook on your collar when you attend... We do however have a new version of The MoOM Mug, which is available exclusively to benefactors.

New From Field Notes Brand

Cherry, Baby

We all know that paper is made from wood. Our 22nd Field Notes seasonal release is made of wood. The Shelterwood Edition features covers made from American Cherry wood, sliced ever-so-thin and bonded to a substrate of kraft paper for durability.

From the Archives

Stuff About SK

As you probably have noticed over the last ten years, we're a bit of obsessed with the films of Stanley Kubrick. Check this sweet collection of behind-the-scenes photos from the set of 2001 and find tons more in our big, messy archive of Kubrickian links.

Reading Assignment

I Had Him for Shakespeare

The Old Man and the River. Pete Dexter's exquisite profile of Norman Maclean from Esquire in 1981. Maybe the best thing ever written about CP hero Maclean, it makes you want to go back and read A River Runs Through It for the 20th time and, especially Young Men and Fire. They aren't making magazine pieces like this any more.

Faces Deserving of Props

The American Century

This is a new entry in our occasional series on type. The consistent beat of Century Schoolbook as it marches across the page is what makes it feel so sensible and familiar in both text and display situations. The vintage (but not old-timey) feel of it seems just about right for a new wave of popularity. Suggested pairing: Futura Std Book, all caps with extra letter-spacing. We used Century Schoolbook for A Drive into the Gap and here's what Bryan had to say in the end notes.

Century Schoolbook is one of 221 typefaces designed by American typography titan Morris Fuller Benton (1872-1948). Century Schoolbook is based on Benton's father Linn Boyd Benton's Century typeface, created for Century magazine in 1894. The younger Benton's version was created at the request of textbook publisher Ginn & Co., with the intent of improved legibility. Century and its variants were originally published by American Type Founders. Formed by a merger of 23 foundries in 1892, ATF quickly became the dominant force in American typography until the mid-20th-century, largely thanks to the Benton's typographical and technological innovations. Century is often cited as the first true typeface "family," a concept quickly embraced by type designers, foundries, and users.

One From Way Way Back

How Do You Spell Courage?

"How do you spell courage?" For the proper effect, check the trailer first and then please take a few minutes (eleven actually) to watch our short feature film about words, pictures and bravery, Copy Goes Here.

The Full Measure

The Weight

The Cold Horizon Edition is our latest Field Notes seasonal limited-edition, but, as demonstrated by this short film, it turns out there's more to a year-long Colors Subscription than the paper it's printed on.

Heads I Win Tails You Lose

Flipping Ridiculous

Before each of our live Layer Tennis matches, Bryan put on his referee get-up and Steve grabbed his camera and they created a short and silent film clip for the official coin-toss which determined the order of play. We did dozens and dozens of them.

For the uninitiated, Layer Tennis is a live competition in which two designers swap a file back and forth in real time, progressively adding layers and revising the artwork. Their "volleys" are posted live online while a third person provides smart and/or smart-alecky commentary. We hosted three seasons of the game and maybe we'll host another someday.

Search Different

Never Not Find What You’re Looking For Again

Think of it as the next generation of search that will change the way people find things on The Internet, E-Z-Fynd. Secret Himalayan headquarters included, plus Peppermints! From CP Labs, the folks that brought you The RinseCam 9000™, so you know it's good.

Notes Sponsorship

Been There, Done That

Follow along on the blog of Ben Saunders and The Scott Expedition, after 100+ days and 1800 miles, they have completed their trek from the South Pole. We're proud that our Field Notes Brand is a sponsor of The Scott Expedition and we're doubly proud of the guys perseverance and courage, and, of course, that our Expedition Editions went along for the trip.

JC at Creative Mornings

The Problem With Doing a Project in
Your Spare Time is That There isn’t Any

Here's Jim's presentation from the inaugural edition of Chicago Creative Mornings. Thanks to Tina, Mig, Gravity Tank and everyone who showed up.

March Guest Robert McNees

It’s All Relative

Robert McNees (rmc) is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Loyola University. Before settling down in Chicago his research took him all over the world to exotic locations like Texas, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Ontario. He's the author of twenty-some-odd mostly readable papers about general relativity, cosmology, and string theory, and was recently named a KITP Scholar at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara. If you so much as make eye contact with him, he will assume you want to hear about black holes right now. He can be found on Twitter, or else holed up in his lakeside office of solitude, somewhere in the snowy wastes of Rogers Park.

A list of all the brilliant people who have helped us by guest editing Fresh Signals can be found here.

Other recent features are listed on Page Two.

Fresh Signals

Local Note: 20x2 returns to Chicago again, tomorrow night at Schubas, featuring lots and lots of Friends of CP, including Mig Reyes, Justin Kaufmann, Dan Henrick, and even me. sd-yesterday

How Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are rushing to cash in on cannabis. ms-yesterday

Good news/bad news for Chicago music fans (you decide which is which): Wax Trax! and Veruca Salt are both back in action! bb-yesterday

How We Used to Live. dw-yesterday

"Using color to interpret emotions, we designed unique color palettes that reflect the albums and music of artists such as Beyonce, Daft Punk and other favorites. The hope behind mixing the beauty of color, music, and emotion is that this will be a source of inspiration for those of you who are music lovers and design enthusiasts, looking to bring color into your home in a creative way." The Sound of Color. dw-yesterday

Lovely, NASA images printed on silk and made into scarves. Via Another Something & Co.. ms-yesterday

The party-ready, tricked-out Apollo 70 Airstream. ms-yesterday

Souvenir booklet from Heinegabubler's Boose (booze) Shop, 536 South State Street, 1905. jc-yesterday

From Chris Ware, Heads or Tails. ms-yesterday

Twenty-five years too late for BB, the KFC Chicken Corsage for prom. ms-04.17

Launch trailer for Hitman GO, a wonderfully odd looking iOS game. jc-04.17

23 things you didn't know about Ford Mustangs. ms-04.17

FotA and former Guest Editor, Mike Sacks, has just gotten a publication date for his follow up to And Here's the Kicker, his hit book about comedians and their writing process: Poking a Dead Frog: Conversations with Today's Top Comedy Writers. sd-04.17

Trailer for Obvious Child. ms-04.17

"Bounty Hunters" Oil on Masonite, Satin Finish. Wooden Gold Frame. By Mats Gunnarsson. c. 2014. jc-04.17

Cameron Booth's massive new project, Highways of the United States of America. "It shows every single current and signed Interstate Highway and U.S. Highway in the contiguous 48 states" in a clear, simple style. Preordered! See also Cameron's fabulous Eisenhower Interstate System in the Style of H.C. Beck's London Underground Diagram. jc-04.17

Colorful illustrations by Lauren Rolwing. dw-04.17

Portlandia's Kickstarter Film Awards. sd-04.17

"A riddle. Children, what is this? A figure? No! It is the name 'Otta', the soap with the crayfish logo!" A quick history, along with some faded billboards and scanned ads, of Prague's Otta Soap. sd-04.17

Dig deep everyone, the Chicago Design Museum needs your monetary assistance. mcj-04.17

Pictures made with the first-generation SX-70 by Life photographer Co Rentmeester. See also Harry McCraken's seminal 2011 essay on the SX-70 and The Art and Science of the Nearly Impossible. Also this. jc-04.17

As of this morning, British Pathe has posted it's entire collection of 85,000 hi-res films to YouTube. Where to begin? How about 10 Tragedies Caught on Film or, on a lighter note, a 1966 Jet Pack demonstration. jc-04.17

Pointer Pointer. jc-04.17

The poster is just ok but the line-up looks great for Cannes 2014. Most anticipated, Map to the Stars, directed by David Cronenberg and JLG's Adieu au Langage in 3D. Really. jc-04.17

From photographer Greg Briggs, his series Melbourne Cleaners. Via My Modern Met. ms-04.17

We linked and loved Andrew Kim's recent visual ode to The Walkman, so we spent some time in his archives and discovered he is collecting, and has an eye for, calculators. Sweet. jc-04.16

It seemed like a good idea at the time. ms-04.16

"But I was able to plot out the locations for every foundry that had been active in New York between 1828 (the earliest records I could find with addresses) to 1909 (see below). All of the buildings have been demolished, and in some cases the entire street has since been erased. But a startling picture still emerged: New York once had a neighborhood for typography." ms-04.16

A-Z of Dance. dw-04.16

Grantland celebrates the city of Detroit . ms-04.16

Macro photos of insects by John Hallmen. Via The Fox Is Black. dw-04.16

Authentic Chicago pothole products at The Pothole Store. dw-04.16

Three pages from an ARPANET Information Brochure, 1978. A nice piece of web history. jc-04.16

Vivarium A & B - 4 color screen print on bristol paper, stainless steel, motor and electronics. dw-04.16

The First Emoticon May Have Appeared in 1648. ms-04.16

The Office Stare Machine. ms-04.16

"You shopped at Sears. You wore Toughskins jeans. You paged through the Fall/Winter catalog, thumbing frayed edges onto the toy section. You mowed your grass with a Craftsman lawnmower, and ate hamburgers off a Kenmore grill. I know you shopped at Sears, because everyone shopped at Sears." Sears is dying. dw-04.16

My fave lunar eclipse photo, from Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta BC, by Yuichi Takasaka. Via Observing Space. jc-04.16

Meals from literature, photos of Fictitious Dishes, by Dinah Fried. jc-04.16

Formula 1 Pit Stops 1950 & Today. Crazy. ms-04.16


Page Two contains the previous 40 Fresh Signals, recent features, a key to the icons and the categorical archives.

Grab our blended RSS feed here.

Find a Job

More @ We Work Remotely.

Translate

French | German | Italian
Japanese | Spanish | Portuguese

One Hundred Forty

Coudal on Twitter

The MoOM Board

One of the most popular parts of our site is The Museum of online Museums (MoOM) which is updated quarterly. Please consider joining the MoOM Board of Directors. A subscription comes with a handsome coffee mug but none of the snootiness so often associated with the patronage of old-school cultural institutions.

Brian Mohney
Unnikrishna Menon Damodaran
Rick Johnson
Leah Blum
Philip Birmingham
Andrew Dale
Patch Superstore
Haris Bacic
Ian McRoberts
Seedhouse
Grettir Asmundarson
Vladimir Gendelman
Tom Shakow
Dallas Shelby
Blueberry Ln.
Michael Russem
James Sampson
Rod McGuinness
Jason Lankow
Nöel Jackson
DJ Edgerton
Carolyn Wood
Mark Powell
Chris Ebmeyer
Christen Carter
Chris Allison
Keith Krieger
Kathleen Devlin
Roger McLeish
Fred Beshid
Katie Harrar
Mary Beth Sancomb-Moran
Daniel Annereau
Dan Rubin
Barbara Ann Kipfer
Sunniva Geuer
Gareth Walters
Claire Zulkey
Sean Palmer
Jane Quigley
Edward Lifson
Witold Riedel
Brian Cook
Anne Herron
Abby Urban
Erik Ratcliffe
Michael Jenkins
Katie Carney
Mark Greenberg
John Boardley
Jon Tan
Robin Sherwood
William Dampier
Don Stillman
John Pojman
Werner Haker
Amy Hostler
Whet Moser
Debbie Millman
Matt Russell
Bill Keaggy
Adam Kruvand
Randy Hunt
David Demaree
Erik Vorhes
Dan Mabrey
Nalani McClendon
Mary Catlan
Anonymous (8)

Supporting the MoOM requires a simple annual non-tax-free contribution of $75. In exchange for your generosity, you'll receive one sweet, tall coffee mug and a permanent listing and link as a member of the Board of Directors. Thank you in advance for your consideration.

We actually do
stuff beside
updating this site.

Find out what.